Cervical Cancer Screening is Essential for Women- Here’s Why

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Cervical Cancer Screening is Essential for Women- Here’s Why

Cervical cancer cases, which are frequently diagnosed in female patients, are alarmingly rising across the nation. However, timely screening can help prevent cervical cancer since it can identify abnormal cervix changes and enable a woman to receive prompt treatment, according to doctors.

Every year, January is designated as Cervical Cancer Awareness Month to increase awareness of the disease and the importance of routine screening exams. It is important to understand why cervical screening is necessary and why it should be done regularly from either clinics or family medical center

Women’s cervixes, which are at the base of their wombs, are where cervical cancer first appears (uterus). The primary cause of this disease is the sexually transmitted infection known as the human papillomavirus (HPV). Pelvic pain following sexual activity is one of the most typical symptoms, as is irregular vaginal discharge. 

Other risk factors for this type of cancer include early sexual activity, which increases the risk of HPV infection, smoking, as well as the presence of chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis, HIV, and Aids, as well as age, a weakened immune system, multiple partners, and unsupervised birth control pill use. 

Precancerous alterations or early malignancies are frequently screened for before signs or symptoms manifest. Women are afraid to speak out in public about cervical cancer since there is still a dearth of understanding about the disease. But from the age of 21 to 65, people should be urged to get a routine test every three years.

Precancerous alterations or early malignancies are frequently screened for before signs or symptoms manifest. Women are afraid to speak out in public about cervical cancer since there is still a dearth of understanding about the disease. But from the age of 21 to 65, people should be urged to get a routine test every three years.

Pap test – This test, also known as a Pap smear, is used to detect early alterations in cells that can develop into cancer. Here, a sample of cervix cells is obtained for analysis. Additionally, an HPV test is paired with a Pap test.

 

HPV test – The HPV strains most frequently associated with cervical cancer are searched for in a sample of cervix cells. An HPV test can be performed separately or even in conjunction with a Pap test.

How cervical screening helps prevent cancer

During a cervical screening, a sample of your cervix’s cells are examined for specific forms of human papillomavirus (HPV).

These HPV strains are referred to as “high risk” strains because they have the potential to alter the cervix’s cells in an inappropriate way.

When screening yields a positive result for one of these kinds of HPV (an HPV result), the sample of cells is subsequently examined for aberrant alterations. Unusual cells have the potential to develop into cervical cancer if left untreated.

Find out more at https://www.dfmp.com.au/

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